Banned Book, Fantasy, Juvenile Fiction

Glass Sentence by S.E. Grove, and other books Timmy read

Sophia’s uncle Shadrack has just been kidnapped and her house destroyed. She finds a note that he wrote he that said, “Go to Verresa.” So she sets off on a train, but her uncle’s kidnappers chase her, for she has brought with her the valuable tracing glass. But will she make it?

Other banned book titles read in September:

Blubber by Judy Blume
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

More Roald Dahl:
Esio Trot
Fantastic Mr. Fox
Matilda

George E. Stanley:
Third Grade Detectives #4 Cobweb Confession
Third Grade Detectives The Mystery of the Hairy Tomatoes
Third Grade Detectives #10 The Mystery of the Stolen Statue

Michele Torrey:
The Case of the Gasping Garbage
The Case of the Crooked Carnival
The Case of the Mossy Lake Monster

Fuzzy Mud by Loius Sachar
Half Magic by Edward Eager
My Brother is a Superhero by David Solomons
Tornado by Betsy Byars
Book Scavenger: The Unbreakable Code by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman
The Secret of Zoom by Lynne Jonell
Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater
The Swiss Family Robinson by Johann Rudolf Wyss
The Death Cure by James Dashner
Daddy Long Legs by Jean Webster
Lord Peter Complete series by Dorothy Sayers
Teresa of Calcutta by D. Jeanene Watson
William Carey Obliged to Go by Janet and Geoff Benge
A Moment Comes by Jennifer Bradbury

 

~Timmy

Banned Book

Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko

This book was challenged on the New York state elementary- and middle-school reading lists (2015). In it 12 year old Moose’s dad gets a job as a guard / electrician at Alcatraz. So Moose, his mom, and Natalie (Moose’s autistic sister,) moved to the island with their dad. Moose’s mom is set on getting Natalie into a school that might help her function better. Moose is good with Natalie and he loves her, but his mom’s new rule that he has to take her everywhere he goes doesn’t sit well with him especially since it means he can’t play baseball after school. A couple times when she is engrossed and sorting stones he goes out of sight for a little while. When he learns that she made friends with a convict while he was gone he panics thinking the worst. But later realizes that they were just friends.
I think this book was banned because it shows criminals as actual people. It was good, I’m glad I read it, but I won’t be hunting down the sequels.

~Naomi

Banned Book

George by Alex Gino

This book is #5 on the top 10 challenged books for 2017. It is the story of an upper elementary school child, named George, whose is transgender. Everyone sees George as a boy, but George knows and feels she is a girl. George holds her true identity to herself, yet wants to reveal her “secret”. George wants more than anything to be cast for the part of a female character in their upcoming class play, hoping to reveal her female identity. But it is the friendship that George has with her best friend Kelly and their special trip to the zoo that makes the story. It is sweet, understanding and accepting Kelly who finally allows George to be who she really is. May everyone have a friend as kind as Kelly, she is a gem!

~Lisa

Banned Book

Beloved by Toni Morrison

What an intense and beautifully written novel! Plot is set in the mid months after the end of the civil war. The south is apathetically trying to establish social norms for the Afro American population. Slaves are still being persecuted by ignorance except in a little place noted as 124. A small house where an elder black woman, her daughter in law and granddaughter reside. The daughter in law murdered her infant baby rather than having her taken from her and sold. The women are ostracized from the rest of the black residents.
This is my first book created by Toni Morrison.
Describing the pain of Seathe, one of the main characters. As she relived memories of the atrocities she experienced as a slave,the confusion about a murdered child and husband and the possibilities now as a free woman was palpable. As I read about a character who presented herself as Sethe’s murdered child, I became confused trying to sort out who she really was, a real being, a spirit, or imaginary? Feeling the confusing, despair and anger . This was very powerful.
Why was this banned? Perhaps the language, sexual descriptions, travesties of slavery, bigotry, or because it was about women.
I am so glad I read this.

~Louise

Banned Book

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian by Sherman Alexie


This book describes itself as a novel, but it sure reads like real life. Alexie did grow up on the reservation he describes. He tells what the worst thing is about being poor (it’s not being hungry) and what it’s like to try to be part of two cultures as a high school student growing up on a reservation but going to the “white” school. Engaging, very sad, and uplifting, too. Banned books are some of the best.

~Alison

Banned Book, Young Adult

What my Mother Doesn’t Know by Sonya Sones

This book came in at #31 on the top 100 banned books for 2000-2009. The story is told from Sophie’s viewpoint. She is almost 15 and is trying to navigate the world of boys, first kisses, raging hormones, etc. She is pretty straight forward with her feelings and she certainly comes across as a decent kid, just trying to figure it all out, along with two of her best girlfriends. I applaud the way Sophie handled a “creepy” guy she met online, basically ditching him abruptly when things turned “creepy”. Her reaction/actions would have been what any parent would have hoped their child would do in a similar situation. But maybe it was the fact that she was online to begin with and chatting with an anonymous boy, or maybe her honest, tell it like it is approach which offended some. (??) The ending is really sweet and it is really surprising that this book came in at #31. #31, really? Did I accidentally skip a page that had something extremely “inappropriate” on it? Hmm. I am left guessing.

~Lisa

Banned Book

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger

I don’t know how I got through school and not read this, I really don’t. But I did, but I read it now. Holden Caulfield, he’s the writer of the tale, he goes on and on about school and how he doesn’t much like school, and how he gets kicked out, again, and what he’s going to do next, and how he really would like to talk to Phoebe. That’s his little sister. Anyway, old Caulfield tells us all about it. Like what he likes and what he hates, and junk like that. The book is not crumby or anything, or phony. It is actually pretty good. I think you would like it, I really do.

~Mike